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Now displaying: Page 1
Mar 1, 2023

While the currency values of today’s economic powerhouses help maintain global financial stability, the currency systems in the 19th century were tied to precious metals and France played the stabilizing role. In the early 1800s, most countries tied their currencies to silver or gold, but Napoleon tied the French franc to both, which sparked the era of global bimetallism. IMF economist Johannes Wiegand has studied bimetallism, and in this podcast, he says this almost-forgotten 19th-century episode shows that international cooperation is essential for a stable global monetary system. 

Transcript: https://bit.ly/41CunjU

Read the article at IMF.org/fandd

Feb 23, 2023

The longtime critics of globalization are having another moment, claiming supply chain shortages, high inflation, and increasing migration are products of an overly globalized world. But history suggests more globalization- not less, can help counter those disruptions in the global economy. Harold James is a professor of history and international relations at Princeton University and an IMF historian. In this podcast, James says globalization offers an antidote to inflationary pressures. 

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3m5mB1J

Look for In Defense of Globalization in the March issue of Finance and Development: IMF.org/fandd

Feb 16, 2023

Alan S. Blinder, former Fed vice chair and one of the world’s most influential economists has had a front-row seat to the changes in central banking over the past several decades. Blinder is also a former member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors, and in his latest book, A Monetary and Fiscal History of the United States, 1961-2021, he recounts the conflicts and collaborations in fiscal and monetary policy that have shaped the United States economy. Blinder was invited to the IMF Research Department to discuss his book.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3xtYUTq

Feb 3, 2023

China’s severe covid lockdowns since the start of the pandemic undoubtedly contributed to an economic downturn last year not seen in decades. And while China has lifted the containment measures and is reopening, the factors behind that slowdown, like its ailing property sector, low productivity growth, and the lingering COVID threat, could weigh on its economic performance this year if left unaddressed. In this podcast, IMF economists Sonali Jain-Chandra and Thomas Helbling walk us through China’s latest economic review, a deep analysis of China’s economy that includes outlooks, risk assessments, and policy recommendations.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3HpduA8

Read the full report at IMF.org

Jan 26, 2023

The IMF’s Resilience and Sustainability Trust (RST) helps low-income and vulnerable middle-income countries build resilience to external shocks and ensure sustainable growth, contributing to their longer-term balance of payments stability. It complements the IMF’s existing lending toolkit by providing longer-term, affordable financing to address longer-term challenges, including climate change and pandemic preparedness. In this podcast, IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva discusses the RST with Prime Minister Mia Motley of Barbados, Rwanda’s President Paul Kagame, WTO Director-General Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, and Makhtar Diop, Managing Director of the International Finance Corporation. The discussion is moderated by Rajiv Shah, President of the Rockefeller Foundation.

Watch the webcast at IMF.org

Jan 19, 2023

Most countries have infrastructure and governance structures that allow the private sector to take advantage of new technologies to innovate and improve payment and financial services. But at the international level, it’s a different story. Cross-border payments are as slow, expensive, and risky as ever. IMF Financial Counsellor, Tobias Adrian, and coauthors published some new research on creating a Multi-Currency Exchange and Contracting Platform that would effectively transform the cross-border payment system. In this podcast, Adrian says payments are the foundation for the entire monetary and financial system, and new technologies can help get global payments right.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3D1RKJ7

Read the research at IMF.org

Jan 12, 2023

Innovation is often associated with developments in information and communication technologies, but for economists, innovation is also about developing new business models and new ways for governments to deliver public services like health and education. Michael Kremer is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago and the founder of the Development Innovation Lab. His work on poverty reduction with colleagues Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee won them the Nobel Prize in economics in 2019. In the early 2000s, Kremer helped develop the design of Advance Market Commitment models used to incentivize the private sector to work on issues of relevance for the developing world. Michael Kremer was invited to deliver the IMF Richard Goode Lecture, an annual event to discuss policy issues and debates. In his talk, Kremer says commercial incentives for innovation are not always aligned with social needs, which results in underinvestment in some types of innovation and creates a role for public investment.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3ka1daT

Jan 5, 2023

We often think about the economy as being driven by how productive we are on the job, but the pandemic made it clear that our personal lives and our work lives are in fact deeply linked. Betsey Stevenson is a labor economist who studies how families are shaped by their economic situations and the decisions that policymakers make. Stevenson is a professor at the University of Michigan and a former economic advisor to the Obama administration. Journalist Rhoda Metcalfe spoke with Betsey Stevenson about her research into the powerful connections between our work and home life for the IMF series on extraordinary Women in Economics.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3X7ihML 

Dec 8, 2022

More than half of the world’s population lives in cities, and it’s expected that almost 70 percent will live in urban areas by 2050. People are attracted to cities for the economic and social opportunities they offer. But if the COVID pandemic taught us anything, it’s that population density presents significant health risks. David Cutler is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and the Chan School of Public Health. Cutler and his Harvard colleague Edward Glaeser write about Cities After the Pandemic in the December issue of Finance and Development. In this podcast, David Cutler discusses the article with journalist Rhoda Metcalfe. He says cities now need to put more emphasis on public health to keep economies healthy.  

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3UHR6X6

Read at IMF.org/FandD

Dec 1, 2022

After decades of being shrouded in suspicion and controversy, nuclear energy is emerging as a viable clean alternative to oil and gas. The war in Ukraine has turned post-pandemic energy shortages into a full-blown energy crisis and nuclear power plants across Europe that were destined to close will continue to operate. Ted Nordhaus is the Executive Director of the Breakthrough Institute, which looks for technological solutions to environmental problems. Nordhaus and coauthor Juzel Lloyd published an article titled The Nuclear Resurgence, in the December edition of Finance and Development. In this podcast. Nordhaus discusses the benefits of nuclear energy with Journalist Rhoda Metcalfe.  Transcript: https://bit.ly/3Uq4yim

Read The Nuclear Resurgence at IMF.org/FandD

 

Nov 30, 2022

Events of the last three years have made life difficult on many levels for millions of people around the world. And while expecting more support from social and financial institutions during hard times is nothing new, the recent rise in prices has left people angry and questioning the efficacy of the social contract between the government and its citizenry. Justin Wolfers is a Professor of Economics and Social Policy at the University of Michigan. In this podcast, he says there has never been a better time to reinvent- for the first time in decades perhaps centuries, the institutions that foster social cohesion.

Transcript: http://bit.ly/3XKUNy7

Nov 25, 2022

Economic progress improves lives, but it can also clash with some of the bigger development problems we face, like gender equality and the environment. Seema Jayachandran believes striking that balance is key to making economic development work for everyone. Jayachandran’s research has helped change gender attitudes in India’s schools, and conserve climate-critical forests in Uganda. Seema Jayachandran is a Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and serves on the board of directors of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab. In this podcast, Jayachandran talks about her work with journalist Rhoda Metcalfe as part of a special IMF series on extraordinary Women in Economics.

Transcript: http://bit.ly/3tW9Wz4

Nov 17, 2022

Inflation is high virtually everywhere, but what’s pushing prices to record levels in Europe is not necessarily what’s fueling inflation in the United States. The European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve share a common problem and similar financial tools to fight it, but Europe’s supply-dominated inflation and America’s mostly demand-dominated inflation require slightly different approaches. Philip Lane is Chief Economist for the European Central Bank. In this podcast, he says finding the “sweet spot” between fiscal and monetary policies will allow for continued support to vulnerable Europeans hard hit by high energy prices and double-digit inflation, while not further straining public finances. Transcript: http://bit.ly/3X55sU2

Philip Lane participated in the IMF’s Jacques Polak Annual Research Conference. Watch the Webcast at IMF.org

Nov 3, 2022

Economic outlooks don’t come easy in the current environment but the latest Regional Economic Outlook for sub-Saharan Africa proved to be particularly challenging. Its title Living on the Edge tells part of the story but in this podcast, economist Wenjie Chen walks us through the research behind the new report. Chen is a deputy head in the Regional Studies Division and part of the team of macroeconomists who dissect regional trends to come up with key priorities for policymakers.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3U6lUBy

Read the report at IMF.org

Oct 20, 2022

Cryptocurrencies have grabbed news headlines with their dramatic highs and lows, and their proponents argue they could revolutionize the financial system, making it faster and fairer. But is the cryptocurrency craze dragging us all into dangerous waters? Hilary Allen is a professor of law at American University and studies the impact of new financial technologies on financial stability. Allen is also the author of The Superficial Allure of Crypto published in the September edition of Finance and Development. In this podcast, Allen sits down with journalist Rhoda Metcalfe to discuss the risks associated with cryptocurrencies and why she thinks that they simply cannot deliver their claimed benefits. Transcript: https://bit.ly/3eJTuOh

Read The Superficial Allure of Crypto at IMF.org/FandD

Oct 19, 2022

Amid growing calls to deglobalize the economy, Raghuram Rajan says not so fast. Rajan, a former Governor of the Bank of India and former IMF Chief Economist, delivered this year's Per Jacobsson Lecture, in which he argues that continued globalization is our best chance to tackle climate change.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3EVhCIC

Watch the webcast of the Per Jacobsson Lecture at IMF.org

Oct 11, 2022

Rising risks to the inflation outlook and rapidly changing views about the likely pace of monetary policy tightening have been dominant themes affecting financial stability. The latest Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) says the Russian invasion of Ukraine has also exerted a material drag on the global recovery from the pandemic and increased financial vulnerabilities. Fabio Natalucci heads the GFSR and Global Financial Markets Monitoring. In this podcast, he says with inflation now at a multi-decade high and tightening financial conditions, it will take time for investors and policymakers to adjust to the new world.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3Ml5h21

Read the full report at IMF.org/GFSR

Read the blog at blogs.imf.org

Oct 6, 2022

With shock upon shock hitting the world economy in the last three years, IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva's customary opening speech to the Annual Meetings warned of a darker global outlook and emphasized the need for the world to come together to deal with the consequences. The speech was delivered to an audience of students at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and presided over by Dean Joel S. Hellman and Georgetown University President John J. DeGioia.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3MgciB9

Sep 29, 2022

How can multilateral institutions like the IMF help close the gender gap? IMF Senior Advisor on Gender, Dr. Ratna Sahay joins Jason Mitchell, Head of Responsible Investment Research at Man Group, on their A Sustainable Future podcast to talk about how gender disparities hurt economic growth. Dr. Sahay has been a gender equality pioneer over the years- helping to break down barriers within her own institution. She now heads the IMF's first strategy toward mainstreaming gender into its core work. Transcript: https://bit.ly/3dNaCm1

Go to  man.com/ri-podcast  to see more episodes of A Sustainable Future with Jason Mitchell.

 

 

Sep 22, 2022

The Michel Camdessus Central Banking Lecture is an annual event honoring the IMF's longest-serving Managing Director. This year's lecture was presented by François Villeroy de Galhau, Governor of the Banque De France, and introduced by IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva. In his lecture, Governor de Galhau says today's multiple crises are challenging public trust in central banks.  Transcript: https://bit.ly/3Sna8Bx

Go to IMF.org to watch the webcast of the entire event including a post-lecture discussion.

Sep 8, 2022

While consumers' expectations of where prices are going are something that economists have been tracking for a long time, understanding how those expectations are formed provides valuable insight toward controlling inflation. New research by economists Carlo Pizzinelli (IMF), Peter Andre (Briq Institute), Christopher Roth (University of Cologne), and Johannes Wohlfart (University of Copenhagen) shows a surprising divide between what experts think and consumers believe drives inflation and other economic trends. Carlo Pizzinelli is the author of an article in the latest Finance and Development based on the study. In this podcast, Pizzinelli sits down with Journalist Rhoda Metcalfe to discuss how the collective consumer mind influences economic policy. Transcript: https://bit.ly/3RMPYAv

Read the study: https://bit.ly/3RrXmlb

 

Sep 1, 2022

Welcome to the 5th and final episode of Fintech Forward, the IMF podcast that focuses on financial technology. Hosted by IMF economist Tara Iyer, the special 5-part series draws from the expertise of the IMF Monetary and Capital Markets Department (MCM) to better understand the impact of emerging technologies on financial systems and local economies around the world. In this podcast, MCM's May Khamis talks about how the IMF's Financial Stability Assessment Programs, which started in the early 2000s, are adapting to the rapid rise of FinTech. 

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3wJ9HZM

Aug 31, 2022

Sanctions are not new, but they deliver bigger global shocks and are easier to avoid than at any time in history. Nicholas Mulder's latest book, The Economic Weapon, the Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War, looks at sanctions regimes of the past to better understand the implications of today's sweeping sanctions against Russia. In this podcast, Mulder says we need to think more carefully about crafting macroeconomic policy at a global level to offset the negative effects that the sanctions are having on third countries.  Transcript: https://bit.ly/3wBUZnq

Read Nick Mulder's article in Finance and Development at IMF.org/fandd

Aug 23, 2022

Welcome to episode 4 of Fintech Forward, the IMF podcast that focuses on financial technology. Hosted by IMF economist Tara Iyer, the special 5-part series draws from the expertise of the IMF Monetary and Capital Markets Department (MCM) to better understand the impact of emerging technologies on financial systems and local economies around the world. In this podcast, MCM's Aditya Narain and Marina Moretti say regulation of financial technology aims to protect consumers and markets, not stifle innovation.  Transcript: https://bit.ly/3wkEMCY

Aug 18, 2022

Economic growth depends on several factors, but a new study (forthcoming) by Eric Hanushek and Ludger Woessmann shows nothing is more important for development than equitable education. Hanushek is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and in this podcast, he says skill differences account for three-quarters of cross-country variations in long-term growth. Hanushek also says the global skills deficit is immense, with two-thirds or more of the world’s youth never reaching even basic skill levels. Hanushek and Woessmann are coauthors of The Basic Skills Gap published in Finance and Development where they say reaching the goal of global universal basic skills would raise future world GDP by $700 trillion over the remainder of the century.

Transcript: https://bit.ly/3AqSxCE

Read the article at IMF.org/fandd

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